Author Topic: Brake Bleeding  (Read 5073 times)

Offline Nik da Greek

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Brake Bleeding
« Reply #15 on: August 04, 2008, 10:54:13 AM »
Hmmm. I\'m never really sure tbh! You read all the bumf on the subject of brake fluid and it says "oooh, never use this type on the street because it\'ll go off unless you change it" and then meet someone who\'s used it for ages and never had problems with it. To be fair, mate, you probably know a lot more about it than me! Your car sounds like a truly well-sorted beast, and if you happily use dot 5.1 on the street, that\'s good enough for me.

I\'ve not had a chance to get into playing with the brake system on my FD properly yet (there\'s always been something more pressing urgent to fix!) but I have put a lot of time and money into faffing with braking systems on my bikes over the years. The best combination I ever found was ductile iron rotors mounted on a circlip drive rather than bobbins, fully-floating on the bell and using an organic rather than a sintered compound of pad. I used this set-up with proper Silkolene racing spec brake fluid and with bog-stock off the shelf Halfords unbranded motor factor fluid, and it seemed to make no difference! Like I said, the major overriding factor seems to be more how much heat the pads/disc combination can lose without transferring it to the fluid in the first place.

The problem\'s even further complicated by the silicone-based fluids, which allegedly don\'t absorb water at all like the glycol or whatever they are traditional type, but still operate under the same DOT ratings! I think it\'s something that should be really straightforward (isn\'t that the point of a universal rating system?) but in actuality is a bit of a black art. I guess the bottom line is that for street use you\'re seldom going to stretch even the standard capabilities of the FD\'s brake system, it\'s only like you said in the first place that when you\'re using it for heavy track work that the cracks will start to show.

Dr-Rotor

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Brake Bleeding
« Reply #16 on: August 04, 2008, 08:07:26 PM »
Hmm yes....just like what happened to me. Iv cracked a set of discs, mined you they lasted for over 200 laps over a 2 year period. Not bad for a street setup & a track bedin that shortend thier life a litte.
 
Yea I agree on the not pushing the stock setup to thier limit on the road. With good pads like EBC yellows, Good fluid & braied line on stock mazda calipers you will find they can stop you very quickly. Besides those huge 6 to 8 piston calipers will just add more weight to your nice light FD.

Offline thomas_mk6

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Brake Bleeding
« Reply #17 on: September 17, 2009, 03:36:13 PM »
what if you have a hydro? lol what order do you do it in then

Offline RobMatthews

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Brake Bleeding
« Reply #18 on: October 18, 2009, 12:06:49 PM »
a hydo is just in line with the rear brakes? so you would just follow the same procedure?


Next question is it the same order for an auto fd? is there any bleeding to be done on the gearbox still?
or is it still same way but no bleeding to be done at theauto box?
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Offline SiH

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Brake Bleeding
« Reply #19 on: October 18, 2009, 01:57:15 PM »
Basic rule is start at the furthest from the MC and work your way towards it - for all hydraulics that are linked :)
With auto you have no clutch, so no clutch slave, so it\'s just the 4 corners.

With a hydro, you need to bleed that after the rears IIRC.