Author Topic: Brake Bleeding  (Read 5086 times)

Offline Gerry M

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« on: March 29, 2006, 03:59:59 PM »
HI all

Do you have to bleed the clutch when you do the brakes as other cars I\'ve worked on with the same res, usually have a wier in them somewhere to separate the fluid for the clutch & brake systems, so you only have to bleed the sytem with the air in it.

Cheers

Gerry
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Offline Donato

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« Reply #1 on: March 29, 2006, 04:11:51 PM »
yeah mate in this order..

nearside rear
offside rear
nearside front
clutch
offside front

cheers

Donato

Offline Gerry M

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« Reply #2 on: March 29, 2006, 04:52:54 PM »
wonder why it doesnt mention that in the service manual. order diff to but it is for a LHD car in the manual
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Offline Donato

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« Reply #3 on: March 29, 2006, 05:18:28 PM »
last time i did it without the clutch and the pedal was spongy, did it in that order and it was fine..

will sticky this thread for others in the future.

Offline Gerry M

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« Reply #4 on: March 29, 2006, 06:18:02 PM »
clutch slave on drivers side of g/box if I remember right?
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rob

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« Reply #5 on: March 30, 2006, 10:17:39 AM »
slight hijack - I think I have the US manual and assume the slave cylinder is also known as the clutch release cylinder??

Offline Donato

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« Reply #6 on: March 30, 2006, 12:07:44 PM »
Quote from: Gerry M
clutch slave on drivers side of g/box if I remember right?


I thought it was the other side...cant remember to be honest... :confused:

Offline Initial-D

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« Reply #7 on: March 30, 2006, 08:34:07 PM »
Recently bled my brakes after a pad change to CC-X too and the difference is well... amazing! I don\'t think I need 6pots just yet!
Cheers


Ben

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Offline richard cash

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« Reply #8 on: June 23, 2006, 02:03:26 PM »
can you bleed the brakes without taking the wheels off??

Offline pdtaylor18

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« Reply #9 on: November 24, 2006, 06:02:53 PM »
yes you certainly can. Even better if you have larger than standard wheels.
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Dr-Rotor

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« Reply #10 on: August 03, 2008, 09:12:37 PM »
Brake expert told me that more pots is for racing to cope with the heat, dose not necesarily mean more stoping power. He said a well setup 4pot system will do just fine for street application & the ocasional track day. You see in racing setups its all about heat, thicker discs & more pots to evenly dispers the heat to stop fade, same reason they put slots & dimples in the disc to help with the heat issue.
 
I use stock calipers with EBC front rotors & stock rear rotors, EBC yellow stuff pads, 5.1dot fluid, braided lines & it will put you through the window from 250kph in less than 100m on my local track. They will die under full on racing like conditions due to heat soak. Thats when you need bigger units.

Offline Nik da Greek

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« Reply #11 on: August 03, 2008, 11:20:45 PM »
More pistons in theory gives you an overall larger surface area to act on the pad, and gives a more even, consistent pressure over a greater length of pad than fewer larger pistons would. It\'s analogous to storing round jars in a square box, the smaller the diameter of the jars, the more you can fit in because they tesselate better, thus storing a greater overall volume. It\'s got as much to do about the trends of the time as any real practical advantage in anything but the most competitive of race conditions, though. You could see the trend in motorbike developement recently, back in the mid 90\'s when Yamaha first put six-pots on, all the other manufacturers had to follow suit to cash in the trend. Now you can\'t find a sportsbike without the de rigeur radial-mounted four-piston calipers, and the six-pots are no regarded as old hat.

Pad compound and disc material probably have more to do with how well a brake system copes with heat transference than caliper design or the number of pistons. You want a disc that gets to operating temperature very fast for instant bite, but does not store heat beyond its optimum range, and a pad that drops heat very fast without passing too much on through the caliper to the fluid, because its when the fluid starts to get hot that the brake efficiency really takes a drop. Then there are other factors like how much moisture content has corrupted the brake fluid, how far down the pad is worn and so lost thermal efficiency, and many other variables. Simple to explain and understand, very difficult to put in to practice and maintain at optimum efficiency! :yes


nice thread resurrection, btw :Thumbs-up

Dr-Rotor

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« Reply #12 on: August 03, 2008, 11:28:32 PM »
Cheers, never knew it was dead.
 
Thanks for adding more info. Also I was told that just because racing brake fluid is for racing & people think its better than normal, well yes it is but it also attracts moisture realy badly when used for street use. If you used a race fluid for street use you need to bleed the brakes quite often. Good tip for new people to track outings as I have learnt. Bleed your brakes every time before each track day for optimal results.

Offline Nik da Greek

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« Reply #13 on: August 03, 2008, 11:41:28 PM »
Good threads never die :)!

Yeah, \'s true, the higher the dot rating of brake fluid, the more hydroscopic it is (think that\'s the right word!) meaning the more readily it absorbs water, which obviously ruins the efficiency. If someone uses a higher-rated fluid on a road car, they\'re generally either deluding themselves about their braking needs on the road, have too much free time to spend flushing through brake fluid every weekend, or are fixing for an unexpected rendevouz with the rear end of a bus :Laugh!

Dr-Rotor

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« Reply #14 on: August 04, 2008, 01:21:46 AM »
Haha....yea the bus things a defenate NO NO. I was told 5.1 dot fluid is good for the street.
 
What do you recon?