Author Topic: Van Veen  (Read 8093 times)

13B

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Van Veen
« Reply #15 on: May 02, 2007, 05:31:25 PM »
Quote from: Ianmcurtis
Thanks 13B. I hope you can manage to get some pics.

If you do get some pics, you might have to ask a full member or a moderator to post them for you mate (?) :wave
Will do that.

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Van Veen
« Reply #16 on: May 03, 2007, 01:12:02 AM »
You can post pictures 13b as you are an overseas guest, that comes with priviledges

13B

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Van Veen
« Reply #17 on: May 05, 2007, 07:59:39 PM »
Did some car talk with my neighbour today. I told him to please take some pictures of the Van Veen bikes next time he visited the owner since i and some other rotary heads wanted to see the bikes, and he promised to do that. It can take some time, but i will post the pictures when he get them. I asked if the owner really was a test driver for Moto Guzzi, and he confirmed that.

Offline Ianmcurtis

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Van Veen
« Reply #18 on: May 06, 2007, 12:16:10 PM »
Great stuff. I\'m sure that the pics will be worth the wait :yes :Thumbs-up
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ocr

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Van Veen
« Reply #19 on: May 08, 2007, 08:35:56 PM »
Being the Norwegian refered to above by 13B I might be able to shed some light to this topic. The Van Veen OCR 1000 was made from 1977 to 1980 in Duderstadt, Germany in a number of 39 including 6 prototypes and test bikes. The man behind the bike was the Dutchman Hendrik van Veen. Mr. van Veen had made a small fortune importing Kreidler mopeds and light-motorcycles to the Netherlands. A sale of over 100000 Kreidlers did not only finance the rotary venture, but also paid for the successfull Van Veen racing team which raced 50cc Kreidlers in the GP. Althought Mr. van Veen did not retire from the two-wheel business as a poor man, he did spend appr. 15 million Deutsche Mark (in 1980 money) on the Van Veen OCR 1000.
 
The first prototype appearing in 1972 was based on a Moto-Guzzi 850GT modified to take a Mazda rotary. Later prototypes and production bikes all used the Comotor 624 engine made for the Citröen GS Birotor. This engine is a development of the NSU RO80 engine. Althought most of the development took place in Holland a factory was set up in Germany to be close to the sub-suppliers. The development took almost 6 years. In the end Porsche was hired to speed up development and carry out the endurance testing of vital components like the gearbox, shaft drive and suspension system. Also the 4 plate sinter-metallic dry clutch was reworked by the Porsche company.
 
The Van Veen OCR 1000 was the first production bike with a hydralic clutch, CV shaft-drive joint, gas suspension front and rear, cast aluminum wheels and automatic choke. It was also the first vehicle ever to boost a digital ignition system. Its creator, German Dr. Günter Hartig later sold the manufacturing rights to Bosch. This bike is an example of innovative engineering when costs is no objective, but it is also a perfect example of a product not asked for. I can\'t help but think that Mr. van Veen built this bike more for himself than for commercial sale. At that time it was the most expensive bike made. The price was 3 times more than a Japanese 1000cc bike. What put an end to the project (at least according to the Van Veen company) was the overnight closure of the Comotor plant, but I believe Mr. van Veen realised that he would never make any money from this venture.
 
Now, the first picture in the thread is from the Deutsches Zweirad und NSU Musuem in Neckarsulm, Germany while the second picture is from the Dr. Felix Wankel Museum in Saal, Switzerland. The third I don\'t recoqnize. About myself I have owned 2 such bikes from new, but one has been used for about 22000 kilometers now. The other is still in as new condition. It is a one-off factory special fitted with a half fairing developed by the Dutch Department of Aviation and Space, no less :-). For this bike I have the optional DVG Solex Zenith electro-mechanical fuel injection system which were made in a number of 2. The main objective of this system was not to boost the power (which it does by 30 hp anyway), but to shift the torque of 136 nm at 2500 higher up the revs to have an even broader powerband.
 
Regards
Jon
 
 
PS About my connections to the Moto-Guzzi factory I was not a factory testrider, but as a long time Guzzi rider and a part time journo I did carry out some endurance tests of certain components among other places on Iceland.
« Last Edit: May 08, 2007, 08:40:47 PM by ocr »

ocr

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Van Veen
« Reply #20 on: May 08, 2007, 09:20:44 PM »
The Van Veen chief-engineer was a young German, Mr. Hans Jürgen Klusowski. As a VW engineer back in -69 he fitted a NSU Spider rotary engine to a BMW motorcycle. This bike was tested by large mags and also exhibited at a large show in Germany. Rumors have it that Suzuki later purchased as it has never been seen afterwards. Mr. Klusowski later worked for the Wankel Research Institute in Lindau, Germany.
 
Another engineer on the development team had a background from jet engines. He patented a middle bearing sandwiched in between the two rotorhousings to avoid twisting the eccenter shaft when supercharging the engine for dragracing. In the end the engine outputted almost 350 hp. Another patent is for the fairing designed by the Dutch Department of Aviation and Space. This fairing reduces the lift at high speeds, but it can\'t be said to be efficient when it comes to drag as it reduces the top speed by at least 10 km.
 
Back in the late seventies the Van Veen OCR 1000 was quite different from most other bikes when it came to quality of assembly. Paint and chrome was top notch. The electric system was switched by relays and the wiring loom was connected by threaded waterproof plugs. All the components used came from the top shelf and those not meeting the standard of quality were made to order. The list of sub suppliers count well known companies like Bosch, Ronal, Brembo, VDO, Koni, Getrag, Hurth, Porsche and Mercedes-Benz.
 
Regards
Jon
« Last Edit: May 08, 2007, 09:24:57 PM by ocr »

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Van Veen
« Reply #21 on: May 08, 2007, 09:40:46 PM »
3 Van Veen\'s were delivered as new to the UK. One was purchased by the US publisher Malcolm Forbes of Forbes Magazine and delievered to his London home. This bike was later exported to the US. Another bike was purchased by an UK actor (I can\'t recall his name) who very soon sold it to a chap in Wales who some years later sold it to Germany.
 
A third bike was purchased by an Arab businessman living in London. His name was Omar Sharif Almandilly and his bike was a one-off with black paint and black chrome and fitted with a fairing and fuel-injection. This guy must have had an obsession with black because every bolt, nut and washer was also black.
 
Regards
Jon
« Last Edit: May 08, 2007, 09:56:22 PM by ocr »

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Van Veen
« Reply #22 on: May 08, 2007, 10:05:39 PM »
Thats fasinating, thanks for the insight and sharing your knowledge

Offline Ianmcurtis

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Van Veen
« Reply #23 on: May 12, 2007, 09:52:19 PM »
Thanks very much Jon, there is certainly a lot of \'behind the scenes\' history involved with Van Veen!

If you do manage to get some photos that can be posted here that would be great :Thumbs-up
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Van Veen
« Reply #24 on: January 03, 2008, 12:59:59 PM »
OCR........... Thank you.

I have just learnt more on the OCR-1000 in 5 minutes of reading than I have in 5 years of searching for elusive info on this rare breed.

REgards

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Van Veen
« Reply #25 on: August 06, 2014, 09:01:08 AM »
Well, in RS11 we had amazing opportunity to see Van Veen. (and Hercules and Norton)
I really cant thank enough that mate who did bring them to show. :)

So I started to do a research about those bikes. Didnt realize that we had one topic here in MRC! Just brilliant info, thanks.

and here is more:

http://www.odd-bike.com/2012/12/van-veen-ocr-1000-dutch-wankel-powered.html
Power is nothing without control. Weight is enemy of performance, handling and braking.

http://s1293.photobucket.com/user/japi_laukkanen/library/Japi?sort=3&page=1